Why did I get involved with the Boykin Spaniels? 

When I was in the first grade, our family moved to Camden, S.C.  The Boykin Spaniel Society did not exist then but some of my friends owned these little brown dogs and I loved animals. Living close to the race track, I did more with horses than dogs but always saw these horse people and other well known Camden families with these wonderful dogs.

After graduating from Clemson University, I moved off and found a great job and a wonderful wife. We tried several different breeds of dogs from Labs, Brits, Springers and eventually in 1996, we got our first Boykin Spaniel Coco from a fellow in Columbia S.C.  At that time we were living in Missouri which is where we decided to name our kennel of one Show Me Boykins.

Before long, we had our forth Boykin Spaniel and started coming every spring to the Boykin Spaniels Trials (I think that is what we called it back then) It was and still is an event we attend  every year for the social aspect of the event since I was not and still not much of a trainer. 

Important to us is improving the natural abilities of the Boykin Spaniels and improving the health of the breed.  The Boykin Spaniel overall health has come a longs ways over the last 25 years due to the support of the Boykin Spaniel Foundation and those that are dedicated to doing all we can to improve the health of the Boykin Spaniel. In 1996, very few people were health testing their Boykins prior to breeding and we estimated that 50% of Boykins were passing their OFA HIPS evaluations.  Today I would estimate that 80% of tested Boykins pass OFA HIP evaluation. If you are looking for a Boykin puppy, do your homework and make sure that sire and dam have all 7 BSS health certifications recommendations.. The Boykin Spaniel Foundation has a very generous reimbursement for most of the out of pocket cost of test so cost is not an issue. An educated home is a loving home, ask questions and if you are not comfortable with the response, keep looking.

Many potential homes are always looking for a female puppy since they believe they will be smaller, do not roam like a male, marking is a concern,... I would say after 25 years, if you are not wanting a female for breeding, be open to a male Boykin.  We have found the male, more attentive, more affectionate, less of a stubborn roaming independent minded which in our kennels makes the male a bit easier to train,

We typically do not maintain a waiting list but save text for those looking for a puppy.  Once we have a litter and on about day 5, we send out a group text to everyone to confirm those still waiting on a puppy. 704-564-9792. Please provide name and location.